Making lives better, keeping you safe

Recruiting now

We're looking for more good people to join our whānau and help us achieve and deliver our mahi - Kotahi anō te kaupapa: ko te oranga o te iwi There is only one purpose to our work: the wellness and well-being of people.

We're looking for more good people to join our whānau and help us achieve and deliver our mahi - Kotahi anō te kaupapa: ko te oranga o te iwi There is only one purpose to our work: the wellness and well-being of people.

Is caring your calling?

Join our Nursing team

If caring is your calling join our nursing whānau and be a part of our holistic vision for healthcare.

If caring is your calling join our nursing whānau and be a part of our holistic vision for healthcare.

Supporting positive outcomes

Become a Psychologist

Assess and treat individuals who have complex needs in prison and in the community.

Assess and treat individuals who have complex needs in prison and in the community.

We're hiring now

We have vacancies across the motu in a range of careers.  Explore the current vacancies and start your journey with us today!

Meet our teams

It takes a village to do what we do. Explore our range of teams to learn more about the roles within Ara Poutama Aotearoa.

Rārangi whakamua - Custodial

A career inside in our custodial environment means working face-to-face with people who have offended. As a custodial staff member it's your role to ensure safety and improve the oranga of prisoners' while they are with us.

Hapori - Community

Support offenders in the community to complete their order or sentence. You will be aiming to engage and positively motivate people to ensure the safety of the community.

Pae Ora

Working in an interdisciplinary team of health practitioners, we provide a range of health and wellbeing screening, assessments and treatments for people inside prison and out in the community.

āe Rangatōpū - Corporate

Those that work in our corporate sector are behind the scenes to support our 24-hour front line operations. From programme designers, researchers, and policy advisers, to teams working in communications, property, legal, human resources, and information technology.

Values

Our five values aren't just what we believe, they guide us in everything we say and do.

Wairua

We are unified and focused in our efforts.

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Wairua

We are unified and focused in our efforts.

  • We provide opportunities to enhance wellbeing, including mental wellbeing
  • We put the person at the centre of our focus, we listen to their voice and provide opportunities for them to talk and think about their situation, their future and how to get there.
  • We connect spiritually, physically and emotionally with whānau and communities in order to succeed.
  • We celebrate success.

Whānau

We develop supportive relationships.

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Whānau

We develop supportive relationships.

  • We proactively involve whānau/family, the wider community and other professionals and work collaboratively to achieve better outcomes.
  • Whanuangatanga (process to establish engagement and connections between people) is something we do inherently.
  • We engage with people to link them with their whānau and provide a community of support where all opinions are considered and respected.
  • We work as a team and share information to achieve better outcomes.

Manaaki

We care for and respect everyone.

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Manaaki

We care for and respect everyone.

  • We treat everyone in humane manner and with respect acknowledging their ethnicity, gender, sexuality and age.
  • We acknowledge and care about the people we work with.
  • We assess needs, target interventions and provide a constructive environment to develop people
  • We engage and communicate using positive language in order to work effectively with all people.
  • We promote personal responsibility and autonomy.

Kaitiaki

We are responsive and responsible.

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Kaitiaki

We are responsive and responsible.

  • We strive to keep everyone safe every day and take responsibility for our health and safety and for those around us.
  • We provide a safe and validating environment where everyone is supported to participate.
  • We are respectful towards human differences and responsive to individual needs and rights.
  • We consider the physical and emotional safety of those around us in every interaction.

Rangatira

We demonstrate leadership and are accountable.

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Rangatira

We demonstrate leadership and are accountable.

  • We provide opportunities for people to develop and have regular conversations.
  • We are transparent when we communicate and explain the rationale for our decisions.
  • We care about everyone's safety and wellbeing, and role model positive behaviour and lead by example.
  • We support people to perform their best and we hold ourselves to account.
  • We act with integrity in all we do.

Recent stories

values mobile

There are plenty of reasons to join our whānau. Meet some of the team here to learn their story.

Police and Corrections join forces for training

Corrections staff were recently joined by teams from the New Zealand Police for Advanced Control and Restraint training at Rimutaka Prison. 

Hariki Whare creates wairua-enhancing environment

For the first time, the Short Rehabilitation Programme for Men was delivered in the small, remote Eastern Bay of Plenty community of Te Kaha. Delivered at the Hariki Whare, the venue provided a therapeutic and wairua-enhancing environment close to the moana.

 

Staff call random muster in te reo Māori for the Māori Language Moment

On September 14, Christchurch Women’s Prison joined the country in marking a historic moment, by calling a random muster in te reo Māori, the first time it has been done.

Leaning into leadership

"Lean into opportunities, feel the fear and do it anyway, and be your authentic self" are some of the takeaways Caleb, currently seconded as an Assistant Prison Director, had from a programme for emerging leaders in the Central Region.

Top FAQ’s

Are you accepting applications for Corrections Officers from overseas?

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What do I do if my application was declined?

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What is the starting pay for Corrections Officers and opportunities for pay progression?

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  • Becoming a Corrections Officer

The starting salary for Corrections Officers is $59,519, with an additional $3,000 variable shift allowance. Your salary will increase as you achieve national qualifications in Offender Management - Level 3 ($64,197) and Level 4 ($69,363).

Promotion opportunities to a Senior Corrections Officer or Principal Corrections Officer role also come with salary increases.

What training do you offer new Corrections Officers?

  • Training
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The Corrections Officer Development Pathway (CODP) is the initial training for new Corrections Officers and Offender Employment Instructors. The pathway starts with an induction week at your site, five weeks at our National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt and continues for a period of 12 months back at your prison site. The CODP includes classroom-based learning, self-led learning, practice in simulated environments and on-the-job learning.

 

There are four phases of the CODP programme:

Phase 1: One week

An induction week will take place at your home site. This allows you to familiarise yourself with your work environment and meet your team. This comprehensive induction will also cover safety and security, role and expectations of a Corrections Officer, access to systems, and your uniform. It’s likely there will be other new starters with you, so you won’t be on your own.

 

Phase 2: Five weeks

Ara Tika for Corrections officers is a two-day induction programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. This programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

 

New Corrections Officers continue their learning for a full five weeks at the National Learning Centre. This learning is focused on custodial practice, safety, and security. You will undertake a series of scenario-based assessments to assess your ability to perform the required practice areas effectively and your level of confidence in doing the job well. You will complete learning focused on managing prisoners and supporting their rehabilitation. Learners will also complete tactical options and control and restraint techniques.

 

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any training that requires staff to be away from home.

 

Phase 3: Four weeks

You will be assisted by a learning buddy, practice leader or experienced staff from your unit, to carry out duties at your prison site. This phase continues for four weeks until you are signed off as competent to apply what you have learnt at the National Learning Centre. You will formally graduate as a Corrections Officer if you have completed your 10 weeks successfully.

 

Phase 4: Remaining 12 months

Over the remainder of the pathway, new Corrections Officers gain work experience that will enable them to complete the National Certificate level 3 for Offender Management.

 

We'll supply the dates for each phase in your offer letter, to allow you to plan ahead.

What is provided during training for Corrections Officers in Upper Hutt?

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  • Training

What ongoing training opportunities are there as a Corrections Officer?

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What development opportunities are there as a Corrections Officer?

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Corrections Officer

When you start with us you'll be paid a starting annual salary while you complete your training. This increases once you achieve Level 3 of the National Certificate in Offender Management, and again when you achieve Level 4.

As you develop experience, leadership skills, and demonstrate willingness to be a role model and coach other officers, you might consider applying to become a Senior Corrections Officer. 

 

Senior Corrections Officer

As a Senior Corrections Officer, part of your responsibility is supervising and supporting other Corrections Officers working on the same shift as you. You’ll be expected to lead, influence and mentor staff working with you. As you lead a shift you will have other responsibilities, making sure units and areas of the prison run smoothly.

 

Principal Corrections Officer

Once you’re a Senior Corrections Officer, you can then work towards applying to become a Principal Corrections Officer. In this role, you’re responsible for managing a prison unit and team of staff to ensure a safe and secure environment that allows prisoners to take part in their rehabilitation activities.   

Again, Principal Corrections Officers need to be good leaders and willing to coach others, but they also need to have really good decision-making skills and the ability to build up a strong team. 

 

Other specialist roles

For Corrections Officers with strong custodial skills, there are also opportunities for further development through working in more specialised areas. Opportunities include Drug Collection Officer roles, Site Intel officers, Drug Detection Teams/Dog Handlers, Site Emergency Response Teams, Site Prosecutors, Movement Co-Ordinators, Tactical Instructors, Prison Negotiators, Receiving office roles, working in mental health, and Advanced Control and Restraint teams (ACR).

Some of these roles (eg Prison Negotiators) are on an as-needed basis and are additional to your usual position, whereas others such as Dog Handling are full-time positions.

Why become a Corrections Officer?

  • Becoming a Corrections Officer
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What hours do Corrections Officers work?

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Full-time staff would work a combination of 8, 10, or 12 hour shifts and the roster patterns would depend on the operational requirements of the site.  

As we operate a 24/7 - 365 day service, you'll need to be available to work rostered hours including nights, weekends and public holidays.

What skills do you need to become a Corrections Officer?

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What qualifications do I need to become a Corrections Officer?

  • Becoming a Corrections Officer
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There are no specific prerequisites, and you don't need to have any prior qualifications - we provide all of the training you need. We are looking for people who work well in a team, are able to identify and respond well to challenging situations, and have good communication skills. In addition, we look for people who are positive role models and can relate to people from all walks of life.

Applicants must meet a minimum criteria including:

  • A current full New Zealand or international driver licence (must be able to drive a manual vehicle as a requirement for this position)
  • The legal right to work in New Zealand, which we can provide support to apply for
  • The ability to pass a full drug test and medical assessment in line with the physical requirements of the role
  • Approval of any declared convictions or conflicts of interest in accordance with the Corrections delegations policy

Medical assessments

  • Application Process

If you’ve applied to become a corrections officer or an instructor, you’ll also be asked to have a doctor (of your choice) do a full medical examination. 

We need to make sure that any conditions you have, such as neurological, psychological or sensory, don’t affect your safety or increase risk inside the prison. 

Unsure or have an pre-existing condition?

We encourage you to disclose all pre-existing conditions as soon as you apply, regardless if they effect your day to day living or not e.g wear hearing aids, take blood pressure medications etc. 

We consider all applications on a case by case basis and can provide you advice and guidance on your specific circumstances.

How fit do I need to be to become a Corrections Officer?

  • Application Process

During the recruitment process, you will need to carry out a Physical Readiness Assessment, which is based on tasks that you’ll carry out in your role as a Corrections Officer. You don't need to be a marathon runner or gym junkie to successfully complete it, but you will need to demonstrate a level of fitness for the role. 

The test includes: 

• Walking between units (a 300m speed walk)
• A simulated search- lifting and reaching
• A call to emergency - run five laps of a 20m course that includes stairs
• A control and restraint activity (grip and pull strength)
• Rescue of an unconscious person (50kg dummy moved 10m)

To pass, you need to complete the circuit within a certain amount of time.

Do I need to be vaccinated for COVID-19?

  • Application Process

There are no COVID-19 vaccination requirements for any staff, contractors, visitors, and providers entering prisons, Community Corrections sites, or Corporate premises.

We still strongly encourage all our staff to be vaccinated and boosted as this provides the greatest protection against the virus.

How safe are Custodial jobs?

  • Becoming a Corrections Officer

Safety is our number one priority, so the training is intensive and starts from day one. You’ll need to be ‘up for it’ as we put you through your paces to make sure you have what it takes to work face to face with our offenders. Like any job, there are risks - but you have a great team who have got your back, and we provide a wide range of training and equipment to keep you safe.

Right to work and Visa requirements

  • Application Process

We will need to see two suitable forms of proof of your identity, typically:

  • your passport and visa (if applicable) or full birth certificate, and
  • your New Zealand driver licence.

Typically, you must be legally able to work in New Zealand. If you are not a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident, you will need a valid work visa before you can start working for us.  

Declaring criminal convictions

  • Application Process

In your application form you will be asked to declare any criminal convictions or pending charges.

The Criminal Records (Clean Slate) Act 2004 means those who have had no convictions within the last seven years, and who meet other criteria in the Act, don’t have to disclose any convictions - except for certain roles.

Applying for a frontline role working with offenders?

The following frontline roles are exceptions under the Clean Slate Act (i.e. Clean Slate DOES NOT apply) and you are required to disclose ALL criminal convictions you have had regardless of when those convictions occurred.

You must disclose any criminal convictions when applying for these roles:

  • Corrections Officers, custodial staff and management roles within the prison.
  • Instructors (Offender Employment) and Principal Instructors.
  • Probation Officers, Community Work Supervisors and other management roles within probation.

You can find out more about criminal records and the Criminal Records (Clean Slate) Act 2004 on the Ministry of Justice website.

Declaring a conflict of interest

  • Application Process

What is a conflict of interest?

  • A conflict of interest means a conflict between your public duty (your role at the Department) and your private and/or personal interests.
  • Personal interests can be financial or relate to family, friends, associations or associates (past or present).
  • Conflicts of interest may be actual (real), potential or perceived.

Here are some examples of potential conflicts of interest:

  • Working with prisoners or offenders who are family members or friends or associates
  • Having supervisory or management responsibility for a family member, or a person with whom you have a personal relationship
  • Having a personal relationship in the workplace with a colleague, offender, client, contractor or other staff working in the Department
  • Having past or present associations with gangs
  • Affiliations with ex-offenders or prisoners
  • Taking part in recruitment processes where a close friend or family member is a candidate for the job
  • Commitments to professional, community, ethnic, family or religious groups that could conflict with your professional role
  • Interests in family or other private or commercial business that has dealings with the Department, such as providers and suppliers

If you are unsure, please declare on your application.

Supplementary Information Form

  • Application Process

Sometimes you may be asked to complete a Supplementary Information Form (SIF) after you've applied.  

This form allows you to provide more information if you've said you have:

  • an association with someone who is currently serving a sentence or has previously been convicted
  • an association with a gang 
  • a conflict of interest (something else that may effect your ability to carry out your role)
  • a personal offence including any interactions you personally have had with any law enforcement agency in NZ or overseas. 

It is important that you provide as much information as you can on this form to allow us to assess your application.  Once you've submitted this we'll be in touch to let you know next steps.

Equal Employment Opportunities

  • Application Process

The Department understands that staff are our most valued resource. We aim to provide a safe, supportive and responsive environment. Our staff have opportunities to contribute to human resource policies that affect them and discuss flexible work options with their manager, who will take into account the needs of the workplace and the staff member before making a decision.


The Department of Corrections is committed to equal opportunity in all our employment policies and procedures.


All staff – regardless of gender, race, martial status, age, disability, sexual orientation, religious or ethical beliefs, political opinion or union affiliation – have access to equal employment opportunities, particularly recruitment, training and career performance management and conditions of employment.


The equal employment opportunities programme complements other human resource initiatives to create and maintain a positive workplace culture and to develop constructive relationships between staff and management.


To help our staff reach their full potential, we offer opportunities for study assistance, career development and performance management.


Everyone has access to support and assistance through our Employee Assistance Programme.

Tangata Whenua

The Department recognises the status of Māori as tangata whenua and its responsibilities to deliver equal employment opportunities to Māori staff.

Psychometric and online video interview

  • Application Process

We’ll send you a link to a psychometric assessment and sometimes an online video interview. There are no right or wrong answers but it gives us an idea about your fit for the role and makes sure that you’ll be safe working with offenders.


The psychometric assessment takes about an hour to complete and we recommend doing it in a distraction-free environment. It's important you answer honestly so we get a good feel to how you naturally respond to different situations.


The online video interview asks you a couple of questions and gets you to think about your motivation and what you might bring to the role. Read tips here about how to nail your interview.

CV

  • Application Process

We get thousands of applications each year and the ones that stand out are:

- Tailored - look at the position description and align your key skills and experience with what we’re looking for

- Simple - make sure it’s easy to read - it doesn't have to win design awards

- Concise but specific – for example, include the month that you started and finished in a job (rather than just the year), provide examples of your skills/achievements

- Has been proofread and the spelling checked 

Stuck? Check out the CV builder and tips at careers.govt.nz

Can you work at Corrections if you have a family member in prison?

  • Application Process

Yes - usually you can!

It’s important to us that you aren’t put in any unsafe situations, so we ask you to disclose all conflicts of interest when you apply. 

These are then assessed on a case by case basis.

I have served time in prison, can I apply as a Corrections Officer?

  • Application Process

Unfortunately, we cannot consider those who have stayed in prison to work on our Custodial team. 

We hold our staff to very high standards in terms of their previous criminal history in order to maintain their safety in the role. 

You may be more interested in working for a programme provider to provide support services to those in prison instead.

Site Visit or SCOPE

  • Application Process

Some roles will require you to complete a site visit called a SCOPE. 

This is an opportunity for you to take part in a job preview and allows you to shadow one of our team members as they carry out their daily duties. This gives you the chance to see what the environment is like, and gives you the chance to ask all the questions you might still have.

If you’ve applied for a job as an instructor or a corrections officer, we’ll also get you to complete a fitness assessment (Physical Readiness Assessment). You don’t have to be a marathon runner or a gym junky as  it can be passed by anyone with  a reasonable level of fitness.

Interviews & Assessment Centres

  • Application Process

Interviews are a two-way process. They are an opportunity for you to find out more about us and the role you have applied for, while the we get the chance to find out more about you.

For more, read our interview tips.

Assessment Centres

This is a half-day session that gets  you to complete role plays, team exercise, written exercises and an interview.   It may sound scary but it’s just a chance for you to show off your natural skills and give you a better idea of what working on the frontline is like. 

You can find out more about what to expect by downloading our Assessment Centre Guide.

Pre-employment checking

  • Application Process

Because of the nature of our work and the high standards of integrity and conduct we expect from employees, Corrections carries out a number of pre-employment checks on  applicants for all roles within Corrections. 


The type of checks depend on the nature of the job you have applied for roles within the Department:

  • referee checks
  • criminal conviction checking - either NZ Police vetting or Ministry of Justice criminal record check, including those required by the Vulnerable Children Act 2014 depending on role type (read more about declaring convictions)
  • drug testing
  • physical fitness test and medical check for corrections officers and instructors
  • proof of identity and right to work check
  • credit checks (for specific roles including finance, procurement, and payroll staff)


All information gathered during the job application and pre-employment checking process will be used, stored and disposed of in accordance with the principles of the Privacy Act 1993.

Referee Checks

  • Application Process

The Department will conduct reference checks prior to a job offer being made.  

We typically ask for two references and prefer that they are:

  • your current manager or someone you have worked for within the last 5 years
  • not personal references, friends or co-workers.

If you're not able to find suitable references, please contact our team to discuss other options.

 

How we complete the checks

We use a tool called Xref - a fully automated, online reference checking platform that securely collects feedback.

Here's what happens:

  1. When we're ready to talk to your referees, you'll get an invitation directly from Xref.
  2. Read through the instructions in the invitation - it'll tell you how many referees we need an remind you of who we need to speak to.
  3. Enter the referees details and hit submit!

You can now put your feet up and relax! The system will send out the necessary forms along with a set of instructions directly to your referees.  You can log into Xref at any time to track to see if they've completed it or if you need to followup and remind them.

TIP:  We recommend you let your referees know a reference check is on its way!

They'll then be able to keep a lookout for the email and can complete quickly so not to hold you up in the process.

Instructor training pathway

  • Training

Instructors complete the same learning as Corrections Officers.

 

The Corrections Officer Development Pathway (CODP) is the initial training for new Corrections Officers and Offender Employment Instructors. The pathway starts with an induction week at your site, five weeks at our National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt and continues for a period of 12 months back at your prison site. The CODP includes classroom-based learning, self-led learning, practice in simulated environments and on-the-job learning.

 

There are four phases of the CODP programme:

 

Phase 1: One week

An induction week will take place at your home site. This allows you to familiarise yourself with your work environment and meet your team. This comprehensive induction will also cover safety and security, role and expectations of an Instructor, access to systems, and your uniform. It’s likely there will be other new starters with you, so you won’t be on your own.

 

Phase 2: Five weeks

Ara Tika for Instructors is a two-day induction programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. This programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

 

New Instructors continue their learning for a full five weeks at the National Learning Centre. This learning is focused on custodial practice, safety, and security. You will undertake a series of scenario-based assessments to assess your ability to perform the required practice areas effectively and your level of confidence in doing the job well. You will complete learning focused on managing prisoners and supporting their rehabilitation. Learners will also complete tactical options and control and restraint techniques.

 

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any training that requires staff to be away from home.

 

Phase 3: Four weeks

You will be assisted by a learning buddy, practice leader or experienced staff from your unit, to carry out duties at your prison site. This phase continues for four weeks until you are signed off as competent to apply what you have learnt at the National Learning Centre. You will formally graduate as an Instructor if you have completed your 10 weeks successfully.

 

Phase 4: Remaining 12 months

Over the remainder of the pathway, new Instructors gain work experience that will enable them to complete the National Certificate level 3 for Offender Management.

 

We'll supply the dates for each phase in your offer letter, to allow you to plan ahead.

 

Programme Facilitator Pathway

  • Training

Programme facilitators take part in Ara Tika, a week long induction programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. The programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

The Programme facilitators pathway follows on from Ara Tika and provides a full curriculum for new programme facilitators over a two year period.

The initial facilitator pathway is an intensive eight week learning programme, which includes three weeks in a classroom environment. Classroom-based courses are delivered in Wellington, Christchurch, Auckland or Hamilton. In between the classroom modules, structured activities and assignments are completed back at your local office so you begin to see and learn about the facilitator role.

The facilitator pathway includes:

  • Self-management (professional behaviour)
  • Facilitation of group learning
  • Planning delivery and reporting of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) therapeutic programmes
  • Application of theoretical concepts
  • Working with Māori and Pacific values, concepts and processes
  • Co-facilitation and management of programme relationships and organisation.

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any programmes that requires staff to be away from home.

Pou Hapori Iho - Probation Officer training

  • Training

Pou Hapori Iho follows on from Ara Tika and provides new probation officers with the opportunity to complete their learning pathway at their work sites, guided by learning and development facilitators. 

You will complete structured learning activities supported by your experienced colleagues. You will also be supported by your manager and practice leaders. 

Pou Hapori Iho includes:

  • Principles underpinning our practice
  • Assessing people in the community (risk assessments)
  • Planning for people in the community (planning for interventions and programmes)
  • Working with people in the community (managing compliance)
  • Developing my practice (reflective practice)

Ara Tika is a week long programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending in their new role. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. The programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any programmes that require staff to be away from home.

Pou Ārahi Iho - Case Management Training

  • Training

Case managers take part in Ara Tika, a week long induction programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. The programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

Pou Ārahi Iho follows on from Ara Tika and provides new case managers with the opportunity to complete their learning pathway at their work sites guided by learning and development facilitators. 

You will complete structured learning activities supported by your experienced colleagues. You will also be supported by your manager and practice leaders. 

Pou Ārahi Iho includes:

  • Principles underpinning our practice
  • Assessing those in our care (risk assessments)
  • Planning for those in our care (offender planning)
  • Transitioning those in our care (release planning)
  • Developing our practice (reflective practice)

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any programmes that require staff to be away from home.

Offender Employment Instructor

  • Training

Instructors complete the same learning as Corrections Officers.

 

The Corrections Officer Development Pathway (CODP) is the initial training for new Corrections Officers and Offender Employment Instructors. The pathway starts with an induction week at your site, five weeks at our National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt and continues for a period of 12 months back at your prison site. The CODP includes classroom-based learning, self-led learning, practice in simulated environments and on-the-job learning.

 

There are four phases of the CODP programme:

 

Phase 1: One week

An induction week will take place at your home site. This allows you to familiarise yourself with your work environment and meet your team. This comprehensive induction will also cover safety and security, role and expectations of an Instructor, access to systems, and your uniform. It’s likely there will be other new starters with you, so you won’t be on your own.

 

Phase 2: Five weeks

Ara Tika for Instructors is a two-day induction programme designed to give new staff an understanding of what Corrections does and how they play their part in reducing re-offending. You will join with other new staff from around the country beginning their careers with Corrections in a range of frontline roles. This programme is conducted at the National Learning Centre in Upper Hutt, Wellington.

 

New Instructors continue their learning for a full five weeks at the National Learning Centre. This learning is focused on custodial practice, safety, and security. You will undertake a series of scenario-based assessments to assess your ability to perform the required practice areas effectively and your level of confidence in doing the job well. You will complete learning focused on managing prisoners and supporting their rehabilitation. Learners will also complete tactical options and control and restraint techniques.

 

Corrections will arrange and pay for travel, accommodation and food for any training that requires staff to be away from home.

 

Phase 3: Four weeks

You will be assisted by a learning buddy, practice leader or experienced staff from your unit, to carry out duties at your prison site. This phase continues for four weeks until you are signed off as competent to apply what you have learnt at the National Learning Centre. You will formally graduate as an Instructor if you have completed your 10 weeks successfully.

 

Phase 4: Remaining 12 months

Over the remainder of the pathway, new Instructors gain work experience that will enable them to complete the National Certificate level 3 for Offender Management.

 

We'll supply the dates for each phase in your offer letter, to allow you to plan ahead.

 

What is the ratio of Correction Officers to prisoners?

  • Becoming a Corrections Officer

This varies according to security classification, and can also be dependent on other activities and related risk assessments, so very hard to give one answer.  You'll always be part of a supportive team who provides you support and keeps you safe.

Can I apply as a Corrections Officer if I have a criminal conviction?

  • Becoming a Corrections Officer

Once you declare an offence, you will be required to complete an additional form (Supplementary Information Form) providing us with as much as information as possible. 

We assess any candidate on a case by case basis  depending on the severity of the conviction and the length of time it has been since you were charged. 

Applicants with the following kinds of criminal record will not usually be considered:

  • Any person who has received a custodial sentence (includes periodic detention and corrective training) regardless of when the offence occurred
  • Any conviction for violence, dishonesty, drugs, a sexual offence, or any offence which incurred a sentence of supervision within the last 20 years (Prison Services custodial positions) or 10 years (other Prison Services positions, and all other services and groups)
  • Any criminal conviction within the last 10 years, with the exception of minor convictions (minor convictions are those incurring small fines)
  • A continued history of minor offences

What is the turnover rate like? Is it a good place to work?

  • Becoming a Corrections Officer

We have a pretty low turnover rate (7-8 percent) compared with around 11 percent for the rest of the public sector. Our staff tell us that they enjoy working somewhere where no two days are the same, and you have a real chance at making a difference in people’s lives.

How long does the recruitment process take to complete?

  • Becoming a Corrections Officer

For our custodial roles, we aim for 6-8 weeks but it depends on a number of factors. For all other roles we work as quickly as possible and will be in touch with timeframes.

If you've already applied please give our team a call on 0800 437 668, we’ll be able to chat with you further about your application.